Negotiating Points for Teachers on Value-Added Evaluations

Posted on June 18, 2010



A short time back I posted an explanation of how using value-added student testing data could lead to a series of legal problems for school districts and states.  That post can be found here:

https://schoolfinance101.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/pondering-legal-implications-of-value-added-teacher-evaluation/

We had some interesting follow-up discussion over on www.edjurist.com.

My concerns regarding legal issues arose from statistical problems and some practical problems associated with using value-added assessment to reliably and validly measure teacher effectiveness. The main issue is to protect against wrongly firing teachers on the basis of statistical noise, or on the basis of factors that influenced the value-added scores that were not related to teacher effectiveness.

Among other things, I pointed out problems associated with the non-random assignment of students, and how non-random assignment of students across classrooms of teachers can influence significantly – bias that is – value-added estimates of teacher effectiveness. Non-random assignment could, under certain state policies or district contracts, lead to the “de-tenuring” and/or dismissal of a teacher simply on the basis of students assigned to that teacher. Links to research and more detailed explanation of the non-random assignment problem are provided on the previous post above.

Of course, this also means that school principals or superintendents – anyone with sufficient authority to influence teacher and student assignment – could intentionally stack classes against the interest  of specific teachers. A principal could assign students to a teacher with the intent of harming that teacher’s value-added estimates.

To protect against this possibility, I suggest that teachers unions or individual teachers argue for language in their contracts which requires that students be randomly assigned and that class sizes be precisely the same – along with the time of day when courses are taught, lighting, room temperature , nutrition and any other possible factors that could compromise a teacher’s value added score and could be manipulated against a teacher.

The language in the class size/random assignment clause will have to be pretty precise to guarantee that each teacher is treated fairly – in a purely statistical sense. Teachers should negotiate for a system that guarantees “comparable class size across teachers – not to deviate more than X” and that year to year student assignment to classes should be managed through a “stratified randomized lottery system with independent auditors to oversee that system.” Stratified by disability classification, poverty status, language proficiency, neighborhood context, number of books in each child’s home setting, etc. That is, each class must be equally balanced with a randomly (lottery) selected set of children by each relevant classification.  This gets out of hand really fast.

KEEP IN MIND THAT THIS SPECIAL CONTRACT STILL APPLIES TO ONLY SOMEWHAT FEWER THAN 20% OF TEACHERS – THOSE WHO COULD EVEN REASONABLY BE LINKED TO SPECIFIC STUDENTS’ READING AND MATH ACHIEVEMENT.

I welcome suggestions for other clauses that should be included.

Just pondering the possibilities.
A recent summary of state statutes regarding teacher evaluation can be found here: http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/86/21/8621.pdf

See also: http://www.caldercenter.org/upload/CALDER-Research-and-Policy-Brief-9.pdf

This is a thoughtful read from a general supporter of using VA assessments to create better incentives to improve teacher quality. Read the “Policy Uses” section on pages 3-4.