Public* Goods & the Money Belongs to the Child Fallacy (in tweets)


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*Education, or public schooling (public school systems) in particular is not typically considered a “public good” as the provision of public schooling does not comply with the definition of a “pure public good” which can be equally accessed by all, without reduction in benefits to any.  The intent here (in the above tweet-storm) was to shed some light on the importance of understanding the role/position of these publicly financed education systems in society and that there’s more to these systems than the year to year provision of “schooling” to those who happen to be school aged in a specific community at a specific point in time.

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3 Comments

  1. What definition of public good are you working with here? The standard definition that economists use for public good would include fire protection for a city as a public good but exclude education because it does not meet the definition.

    1. appreciate the clarification, and would have written “quasi” (as per roads) or some more nuanced explanation (to account for exclusion, benefits reduced from congestion, etc.), but for the limitations of the initial exchange occurring on twitter.

      my intent was merely to point out that publicly funded education systems are more complex than mere current year subsidies to eligible children. again… all via twitter.

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